Blythe in Classic Art: Series 1

Blythe in Classic Art: Series 1 is inspired by twelve of my favorite paintings (one is actually a sculpture). I selected works that express a mystery that is, in my opinion, the essence of Blythe. Blythe is an ideal muse to re-invent favorite masterpieces, and in turn we can illuminate the depth and versatility of Blythe's magical character, allowing us to fall in love with her over and over again.

#1 Blythe Venus (detail)

#1 Blythe Venus (detail)

Based on Sandro Botticelli's painting, The Birth of Venus. This is a close up of Venus, born of the foam of the sea, showing the innocent beauty of her face and displaying her spectacular hair.

#2 Blythe Mona Lisa

#2 Blythe Mona Lisa

Mona Lisa, by Leonardo Da Vinci, has been forever linked with the adjective "enigmatic", meaning "mysterious", true to the essence of Blythe. Mona Lisa, in this image, was modeled by a Kenner doll named Grace.

#3 Blythe de Milo

#3 Blythe de Milo

This drawing of a sculpture was modeled after the famous Venus de Milo, actually a statue of Aphrodite found on the Greek island of Milo. The Blythe model for this drawing was Bambi-Friend2Animals, customized by Elle Marie of Dollface.

#4 Blythe with an Ermine

#4 Blythe with an Ermine

This drawing was modeled after Leonardo Da Vinci's painting, Lady with an Ermine. The Blythe doll modeling for this drawing was Isolde, a Zaloa Studios creation by the talented Amy Artemenko.

#5 Blythe with a Pearl Earring

#5 Blythe with a Pearl Earring

The inspiration for this drawing is the well known painting by Johannes Vermeer, Girl with a Pearl Earring. The "girl" in this case, was modeled by Isolde, a Zaloa Studios creation by the talented Amy Artemenko.

#6 Blythe Lady of Shalott

#6 Blythe Lady of Shalott

In this version of Lady of Shalott, by John W. Waterhouse, the Lady looks directly upon Sir Lancelot from out of her tower, bringing a curse upon her and cracking the mirror behind her. The sudden impulse to take the forbidden glance is depicted in the Lady being tangled up in her weaving and in the deep mysterious look in the doll's eyes, modeled by Isolde, a Zaloa Studios creation. This may still be my favorite. For the poem, The Lady of Shalott, see the link below.

#7 Blythe Circe Invidiosa

#7 Blythe Circe Invidiosa

The original painting by John W. Waterhouse, which this drawing is modeled on, is of the goddess Circe, from the epic work, Odysseus, corrupted by jealousy, poisoning the pool where Scylla is to bathe. My model was Isolde, a creation by Amy Artemenko of Zaloa Studios.

#8 Blythe Mermaid

#8 Blythe Mermaid

This is simply a painting of a mermaid by John W. Waterhouse, one of the Pre-Raphaelite painters. The model for this drawing was Isolde, a creation by Amy Artemenko of Zaloa Studios.

#9 Blythe Ophelia

#9 Blythe Ophelia

This John W. Waterhouse painting depicts Ophelia, from Shakespeare's Hamlet, on the banks of the water just before her suicide by drowning. The far away gaze in her face is haunting and terribly sad, modeled by lovely little Bambi-Friend to Animals, created by the talented Elle Marie of Dollface.

#10 Isolde

#10 Isolde

In this drawing, Isolde, the Blythe doll, models for her namesake, a Celtic Princess, painted by the french painter, Gaston Bussiere. She is gorgeous, (if I say so myself).

#11 Blythe May Sartoris

#11 Blythe May Sartoris

The young lady, age 15, in the original painting by Frederic Leighton, was thought to be the daughter of a close friend of his. Here, she is modeled by the sweet, innocent and ageless face of Blythe doll, Isolde, customized by Amy Artemenko.

#12 Blythe Proserpina

#12 Blythe Proserpina

Look at that face! Dante Gabriel Rossetti painted this painting 8 times. For my drawing, I used both his 7th and 8th version in order to get the details I wanted. (In his 7th painting Proserpina has coal black hair, and in his 8th, she has fiery red hair.) Proserpina is the Roman name for the goddess Persephone. My model was Isolde, a creation by Amy Artemenko of Zaloa Studios.

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#7 Blythe Circe Invidiosa

The original painting by John W. Waterhouse, which this drawing is modeled on, is of the goddess Circe, from the epic work, Odysseus, corrupted by jealousy, poisoning the pool where Scylla is to bathe. My model was Isolde, a creation by Amy Artemenko of Zaloa Studios.